Making more in a week than many workers

By Vatapuia Maiava and Ilia L Likou ,

412 Hits

THE POTENTIAL OF ROADSIDE STALLS IS GREAT: Atiae Fa’afiti, 48, from the village of Tuana’i.

THE POTENTIAL OF ROADSIDE STALLS IS GREAT: Atiae Fa’afiti, 48, from the village of Tuana’i.

It’s been said a lot lately, farmers have the potential to make quite a bit of money compared to many people with jobs.

Only limited by your willingness to work, as a farmer all you need is some dirt, seeds, a good attitude and then a place to sell and you are on your way to making a fortune.

That’s how Atiae Fa’afiti, from the village of Tuana’i, sees things. Although she only started her roadside stall to help out with the family, the determined mother says it’s very much worth it.

“If I am to be honest with you, if I didn’t do these sorts of things then I wouldn’t know where I would get money to take care of my family,” she told the Village Voice.

“We all have to find ways to deal with the high cost of living and this is what I do. I bring pineapples, homemade koko and papaya to the side of the road to sell.

“I have children to feed and put through school, I have to take care of my family. That’s why making as much money as possible is necessary, life is too expensive.”

Atiae says that the main reason she works hard in the plantation and then at her roadside stall is because there are so many things that she needs the money for.

“The one thing I know for sure is that if I don’t stand up and do this then my family will suffer and I don’t want that,” she said.

“Some of my children currently have jobs but when they get their pay, it’s not nearly enough for everything. That’s why I need to be in front here selling.

“Whatever money we get, there is already something that we need to spend it on. We have obligations and family things that take a lot of money.”

Atiae Fa’afiti’s items for sale at her roadside stall at Tuana’i.
Atiae Fa’afiti’s items for sale at her roadside stall at Tuana’i.

But don’t get her wrong, she enjoys the work she does.

“For me personally, I like selling things in front here,” Atiae admits.

“At the end of the day, no matter how much I make I know that it’s worth it and I am profiting from the things I grow.

“I am originally from Afega, but my husband is from this village.”

And the large amount of money she makes is just a really big bonus for her.

“I reckon people who sell things like me on the side of the road have the potential to make more money than those working,” Atiae said.

“An example would be, I can sit here one day and when many people buy things, I can make $100 from just a few hours.

“On the other hand, workers would work for a whole week and make small amounts of money. Farmers who sell like this will make so much more money.

“In other words, we can make $500 a week while workers are stuck with $50 a week.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

Developed by Samoa Observer in Apia