Father’s plea for water help

By Fetalai Tuilulu’u ,

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Water struggle: Sefau Evi aged 64.

Water struggle: Sefau Evi aged 64. (Photo: Fetalai Tuilulu’u)

Sefau Evi, 64, from the village of Leauva’a, can handle most things but living without water is something he cannot continue to do.

The family relies heavily on fetching water from their neighbour to survive.

“We’ve lived here for years now and this was a huge problem since then,” he explained to the Village Voice. 

 “Right now we are in need of a water tank because we fetch water until it rains then we get to have water of our own.  

“We reported the problem to the Water Authority, and they told us to wait because there’s a lot of work to do about it. 

“Until now they still can’t fix it.  

“So we humbly request to anyone who could help us with this matter.” 

The elderly father says they are desperate for water.

 “To be honest, we can’t keep fetching water every day, its hard work.

“This is my daily job before I go to work because I can’t let my small children go and fetch water. 

“So before and after work I make sure we have enough water. 

“As you can see, we only have buckets to store water. We are in need of at least a water tank or a pipe for water on our own because of the children’s schooling, and especially for food.  

“The only issue we have is in regards to not having enough money.” 

With only one provider, Sefau struggles to make ends meet with the little his family makes. Sefau is a security guard for the Robert Louis Stevenson museum. 

“What I earn from work, together with the help from plantation is all we have to survive.

 “We are still trying to develop our house here,” he said. 

“This is the family’s house and I want it to be enough for the children. 

“To be honest we can make do with what we have but what is needed the most is our own water. 

But other than the issues mentioned, Sefau says that life here is very great. 

“The great thing about living here is that we have a very huge land to work on and it’s peaceful,” he said. 

“On the coastal areas you have to make your way inland to fetch taro but over here you just walk over there get the taro and then make it. 

“My family doesn’t go hungry at all.

“Everything is good; we only have issues with the water supply. That’s all. 

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